One Egg Haiti

One Egg Haiti




In Haiti, One Egg is working in partnership with Chancel, a U.S. based social enterprise, and the Rhode Island Conference of United Church of Christ’s (RIC-UCC) Haiti Task Force to provide one egg a day to children in 6 child centers that serve impoverished children in Haiti. Now, with financial support from Chancel and the RIC-UCC Haiti Task Force, One Egg Haiti purchases eggs from Haiti Broilers, a local company that operates a state of the art model poultry farm outside Port au Prince. As of today, approximately 500 children are receiving one egg a day.

The Origin of One Egg Haiti

dsc_1065A young woman is returning to New York after visiting Haiti for the first time to check on the progress of her father’s retirement home. Another woman is returning to New York after a trip to Haiti with a group of people from churches throughout Rhode Island to visit the sites their mission supports. Both women find themselves sitting in the last row of seats on the plane because neither was able to get a seat assignment before arriving at the airport.

It is more than a mere coincidence.

Before the plane even takes off, the two women discover a common concern – the hungry children they have both seen during their visit. Both had been devastated to find that the problems of hunger and malnutrition that previously existed in Haiti have only been exaggerated by the rains that hurricane Sandy had recently poured on the country. By the time the plane lands, the two vow not only to find a way to feed the children, but they are determined to find a way to help the Haitians in the communities they serve become self-sufficient and produce their own food.


A Plan is Hatched (Pun Intended)

dsc_0152One Egg Rwanda was achieving positive results in the lives of malnourished children by providing animal protein in the form of one egg a day. Could these results be achieved in Haiti? A source of eggs was discovered at a company called Haiti Broilers located in Port au Prince. Haiti Broilers is a vertically integrated poultry company that is a subsidiary of the very successful Jamaica Broilers. The eggs would be purchased from Haiti Broilers and distributed to the children in five sites that were determined to be the neediest. Would One Egg be interested in supporting a chapter in Haiti? The answer was a resounding, “Yes” and One Egg Haiti was born.

The Ultimate Goal

dsc_1236Feeding the children is necessary and One Egg Haiti plans to add more children to the nutrition program. However, feeding the children is not the ultimate goal. The program will only make a permanent change for Haiti if the Haitian people can find a way to help themselves. There’s a plan for that, as well. Communities where the One Egg program exists will be encouraged to build their own for-profit poultry farms. With technical support from Haiti Broilers, seed money from the One Egg Haiti partners and hardwork on the part of community members, poultry farms will be built. Eggs can then be purchased from local poultry farms that employ Haitians. The market for eggs in Haiti is enormous – the farms will not only provide the eggs for their own children, but they will produce eggs to be sold for profit in the marketplace. And one more benefit. The farms will provide jobs for Haitians in this economic environment where jobs are scarce and unemployment is high. This describes the One Egg Haiti model, which was successfully implemented in Rwanda. A win, win for everyone.